spies-never-compromise:

Joan of Arc by Harold H. Piffard

spies-never-compromise:

Joan of Arc by Harold H. Piffard

(via anniewu)

arpeggia:

Christian Hetzel - Blue Silence, 2012, acrylic, string on canvas

arpeggia:

Christian Hetzel - Blue Silence, 2012, acrylic, string on canvas

heidisaman:

"My car’s my best friend. My office. My home. My location. I have a very intimate sense when I am in a car with someone next to me. We’re in the most comfortable seats because we’re not facing each other, but sitting side by side. We don’t look at each other, but instead do so only when we want to. We’re allowed to look around without appearing rude. We have a big screen in front of us and side views. Silence doesn’t seem heavy or difficult. Nobody serves anybody. And many other aspects. One most important thing is that it transports us from one place to another."

— Abbas Kiarostami

Stills from Certified Copy (2010) and Like Someone in Love (2012)

(via criterioncollection)

"Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night."

Sylvia Plath

(via marcescentfleur)

(Source: raccoonwounds, via bibliogato)

(Source: lapitiedangereuse)

everyframeapainting:

Satoshi Kon - Editing Space & Time
Let’s honor one of the greats. RIP.

A great cinema analysis series takes on one of my favorite filmmakers.

"Each story in Cosmicomics begins with a scientific premise, which serves as a springboard for a story. The protagonists might be mollusks or dinosaurs or even physical or mathematical constructs, but Calvino infuses them will all the foibles and fancies of humans. Here we encounter unfettered ambition, pride and envy, jealousy and desire — all the same ingredients that we cherish in ancient Greek tragedy or Elizabethan drama, but now translated into an extravagant scientific framework. None of the science here really adds up, but you won’t complain, because Calvino compensates with fancy for his abuses of the rules of physics. Consider the end result a kind of Einsteinian magical realism.”

Italo Calvino’s Science Fiction Masterpiece,” by Ted Gioia, via The Millions

jessicajoylondon:

Float II
8’ x 8’
ink on yupo
2014

jessicajoylondon:

Float II

8’ x 8’

ink on yupo

2014

"My fondest dream is that it will be the date movie that breaks up couples nationwide. Maybe people will walk out of there and think, ‘Maybe not. I don’t know if I know you well enough.’"

Gillian Flynn on Gone Girl (2014), dir. David Fincher (via paulthomasandersonn)

(Source: filmlinc.com, via currentboat)

americanmensa:

Forty-five years ago today, three American test pilots sat atop a Saturn V rocket, nervous but ready to jettison toward Earth’s only natural satellite. By week’s end, they’d beam back photos and video from 240,000 miles away.

To celebrate, here are a couple of treasure troves: The Motion Picture Preservation Lab has excellent archival footage of NASA’s Orbital program. The Smithsonian hosts an awesome collection facts, stories and images. And the archives at the Lunar and Planetary Institute certainly worth some investigation.

(via pinstripesuit)

beatonna:

The Elements of Style - useful for all of us from time to time

beatonna:

The Elements of Style - useful for all of us from time to time

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

(via epanistamai)

(Source: theslickavenue, via steffvt)

Exploring the Sacred Valley of the Incas in Peru, via Slate

loriadorable:

The motto

I’d read that book.

loriadorable:

The motto

I’d read that book.

(Source: daynaelaine, via garm0nbozia)